a picture of a toy fish on the grass

When you leave a roll on a shelf for too long

I had a couple of rolls sitting on my shelf for some time, and when I finally processed them several frames had these lines across the picture. At one point I blamed my camera, but then the effect would be consistent across multiple rolls, which was not the case.

And then I heard guys on the FPP podcast talking about light piping. Turned out it is when an unexposed or exposed roll of film is kept without any light sealing for a long time before processing. Bingo! Exactly my situation!

My workflow with film is kinda slow these days, and I tend to leave exposed rolls on a shelf as a reminder to myself to develop them. Otherwise I can forget about them completely. This small trick works only partially because while I’m constantly reminded, I still can’t get to doing it soon enough.

Now, when I learned the reason for those lines, I can at least make sure I keep my film light tight, and maybe I should come up with another way to remind me I’ve got some film to soup.

A silhouette in warm tones

It’s funny what one can fish out from the photo archive sometimes. Absolutely by accident I came across the photos from my studio photo shoot 7 years ago. That was my one and only time I shot in a studio with all the fancy strobes and stuff. My wife’s friend who is a professional photographer now and was studying back then wanted to have a photo shoot with my wife. Out of the blue, I suggested to rent a studio for a couple of hours and she (friend) agreed. So basically I piggybacked into the studio for no particular reason but curiosity.

My wife’s friend who is a professional photographer now and was only studying back then wanted to have a photo shoot with my wife. Out of the blue, I suggested to rent a studio for a couple of hours and she (the friend) agreed. So basically I piggybacked into the studio for no particular reason but curiosity.

While most of the photos are either my wife’s friend work or family archive, I’ve found this picture to show. Being a “bad” frame as you can see because the flash didn’t fire, it came out as a silhouette in warm tones and now I kinda like it.

The funny thing I mentioned in the beginning is that while looking at those studio photos I realize what fun working in a studio can be. Since that occasion, I hardly ever thought of doing this again. Only in the context of film photography, but considering all the fuss with flash syncing and film speeds, and inability to try and check the settings, I’m not sure I’ll get there soon.

What’s your relationship with studio work?

Thanks for reading and watching!

I’ve got a feeling

alley

Unrelated to any challenges or projects I just wanted to show this photo and share some of my feeling about it.

This woman on the right, walking away with a baby carrier, is my wife, and this was the reason why I made this photo. Another reason was to test either a Zenit camera (Zenit B it was I guess) or Helios lens or to try out Portra film or everything combined. Actually, it doesn’t matter.

The things is, every time I look at the picture I feel like I’m looking at a 3D miniature model of a real life situation. You know, like when you look at a scale model of a city in a museum.

Maybe it is because of its shallow depth of field effect or maybe it’s something else, but from all of my film photos only this one makes such an impression. It feels so real to the point of being creepy even.

What do you think? How do you feel about it?

Locals

Olympus 35DC, Ilford HP5
Olympus 35DC, Ilford HP5

As my contribution to this week’s Photo Challenge I’ve decided to choose this photo from my first trip to Amsterdam back in 2012.

It was a business trip, so I had to wake up early and go meet some people. Though my hotel was about 30 minute’s walk from the meeting point I decided to walk anyway and shoot some morning Amsterdam streets. The picture framed itself in a moment when I noticed that the father and his son are sitting under the sign “Locals”. And locals they are indeed.

A beggar

A Beggar. Lubitel 166, Kodak T-Max 100
A Beggar. Lubitel 166, Kodak T-Max 100

I’m not particularly fond of taking pictures of homeless and destitute people. When it comes to ethics in street photography this demographics is one of the most controversial topics. And one of the most popular to shoot as well. And as long as I don’t want to make any statement with my pictures I prefer not to opt for this quick-n-easy street scene. (Eric Kim has got a very good video about ethics in street photography)

But this photo is an exception. The building behind is the headquarters of one of the largest oil companies in Russia, so the opposition or contrast here is kinda obvious. Something along the line of poor-rich etc. When I saw this woman I thought “well, that’s just symbolic. Russia is one of the biggest oil countries in the world, and those companies earn billions of dollars, and almost every one of them belongs to the government at least partially. So how come there is no proper social care and help for these people?”

Another way of looking at this photo, considering the background, is that the woman begs the rich in that building for some money.

You can think of your own message as well, so I’m not going to go deep into the analysis. Just let me know what you think of this shot in the comments.

A sneak peek.

image

This was meant to be a post with a story behind the photo, but it suddenly turned out to be a post with a story about the photo.

I found it in the deepest corner of my instagram and decided to share here. This trivial task failed when I realized that I don’t have a copy of the photo on my phone, and instagram doesn’t allow sharing with other websites. I looked for it further and found the post-processed copy in my vsco online profile, but not in the app. Sharing from the profile is also impossible, so the only way out was to take the original and edit it once again.

After half an hour of scrolling down my Google photos backup back to December 2013 I’ve managed to find it and thus finally bring it here.

The lesson for everyone here is: keep copies of you favourite mobile photos on you phones or backed up, so you don’t have to go through the editing process again.

As for the picture itself, I particularly like the man sitting next to the girls wondering what they are watching.