Do you like coffee? I do.

Huawei P9, Leica Dual Camera. Eilat, 2017

Ok, it’s not going to be about my love for coffee. Rather it’s going to be about how I love taking photos and posting them here, though one could disagree looking at my posting rhythm.

Anyway, let’s make it quick and simple because I don’t want to feel more awkward than I do.

The point is that as much as I would like to keep my website alive only on my own, it’s hard to find any extra finances for it when you’ve got a family with two kids. I don’t blame them for that in any way but it is what it is.

Till now I managed to keep the website alive but most of the time it was more of a life support than a full funding. Unfortunately, even this life support option is no more.

Which brings me to you, my dear followers and readers.

Some of you have already showed your support for my photography by buying my book on Blurb and I’m grateful for that. But I also understand that for some people a book is not always a suitable option, though otherwise they would gladly consider expressing their support.

Now if you ever wish to help the blog going you can do it in the form of a coffee donation. It’s way less than buying the book and I know that a small encouragement of someone’s efforts not only helps that person but gives you a warm feeling inside. Exactly like coffee.

Thank you.

 

 

A photo of two people sitting next to a shop window with mannequins

What about those mannequins anyway?

The juxtaposition of people and mannequins is quite a popular trope. After all, there's a lot of symbolism as well as parallelism when you put a real person next to a plastic human-shape object. We've seen it many times in many places, not only photography of course, and mannequins were even used to scare us in one of the episodes of Doctor Who, as I remember now. But anyway, it's not my point.

The point, however, is that I'm guilty of using that trope too, and in case of this photo life just threw this chance at me to take. Funny, though, that I've posted another photo of people and these same mannequins some time ago. In both pictures, the people are kinda strange looking in some either work or just dirty clothes, while the mannequins are all slick, clean and finely dressed. It's like as if they look at us reproachfully and say: "Hey, get yourself some clean dress already!"

It’s over, Kodak.

On Judgement Day (Yom Kippur). Olympus 35DC

 

Well, this is it. My 100 ft roll of Kodak Tri-X is over.

As it was my first time rolling film myself I wanted to write down some points for the future based on the experience.

  • always remember to put the cassette case on the spool before starting rolling
  • use good tape when fixing film on the spool or it would break loose inside the camera on the last frame
  • always remember to mark your finished rolls somehow so you can’t accidentally shoot it twice
  • if fail to do that (marking), you risk developing a clean roll of film
  • Kodak Tri-X curls as hell

Those are true lessons learned hard way but on the other hand, it was really fun to use Tri-X as you have probably seen here or here. With that said, I’m not rushing to buy another 100 ft roll of any film. Why?

While I was shooting my hand-rolled stock I saw lots of cool films people shoot with and wanted to try them as well. Being kind of bound by the film stock I had I didn’t feel right to buy more, considering the shipment prices and all.

Now when it’s over I want to take a break and try some other stuff and the first batch has already arrived from FilmPhotographyPodcast store (yay!). Hope to share the results from their films soon.

Cheers!

Mannequins

Mannequins. Lubitel 166B, Kodak T-Max 400

Found this frame in my Moscow archive. Always thought the people here looked strangely similar to the mannequins.